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Calendar of Events, 2006-2007
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Mondays, September 11-December 4, 7:00-10:00pm
"The Epic of Creation: Scientific, Biblical, and Theological Perspectives on Our Origins"

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 1100 E. 55th St., Chicago

  • sponsored by the Zygon Center for Religion and Science
  • for more information and a full lecture schedule, visit http://zygoncenter.org or contact the Zygon Center at 773-256-0670 or zcrs@lstc.edu

Monday-Tuesday, September 18-19
"Critical Perspectives on Religion and the Environment" conference

Woodbrooke Study Centre, Birmingham, UK

  • this conference will bring together academics to discuss and debate themes including gender, religion, and the environment; environmental ethics and religion; geography, place, and religion; postcolonial critique of religious environmentalism; ecotheology; and indigenous religions and the environment
  • keynote speaker will be Dr. Bronislaw Szerszynski, author of Nature, Technology, and the Sacred and Senior Lecturer in Environment and Culture, Institute for Environment, Philosophy, and Public Policy, Lancaster University
  • to register, or for more information, click here or contact enquiries@prs.heacademy.ac.uk

Thursday, September 28, 7:00pm
"Beyond Genes and Memes: Evolutionary Science and the Origins of Religion" lecture

Augustana Chapel, Lutheran School of Theology, 1100 E. 55th St., Chicago

  • The human religious imagination, gloriously unique in its dimensions, has a surprisingly long evolutionary history. Its deepest roots may be traced back to tendencies for empathy and compassion, and for xenophobia and brutality, seen in our ape-like ancestors. King argues that the key to this evolutionary history is the emotional transformation in meaning-making that takes place when people--or their evolutionary ancestors--come together in groups to pray, sing, dance, grieve, or exult, and experience dimensions beyond the here and now.
  • An evolutionary perspective that focuses on mutual creativity and transformation escapes the "reduction" of religion to mere genetic or cultural replication via the God genes or God memes of recent popular scientific literature. That human religiousness developed in this way has significant implications for the study of emergence, and for an understanding of the relationship between science and religion.
  • Barbara J. King is Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary and the author of _The Dynamic Dance: Nonvocal Communication in African Great Apes_ (Harvard, 2004) and the forthcoming _Evolving God: A Provocative View on the Origins of Religion_ (Doubleday, 2007)
  • suggested donation $5.00; free to students
  • sponsored by the Zygon Center for Religion and Science as part of its Sept. 28-30 conference on "Emergence"
  • for more information, contact the Zygon Center at 773-256-0670, zcrs@lstc.edu, or http://zygoncenter.org

Friday-Sunday, September 28-30
"Emergence: A Better Vision of Nature, Science, and Religion?" conference

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 1100 East 55th. St., Chicago

  • Scientists discuss it, philosophers define and evaluate it, and theologians get excited about it. The term "emergence" keeps popping up almost everywhere. For some, it seems to be the magic wand that explains (almost) everything. Others understand emergence to furnish the ultimate justification of ontological naturalism, thus leading to a non-theistic or anti-theistic worldview. Others again invoke emergence as a rational way of bringing immanence and transcendence together, thus arguing for the plausibility of theistic worldviews.
  • For some, emergence is all about hierarchies and levels of order. Their guiding metaphor is the ladder. Others view emergence as a feast of interconnectedness in and between systems of systems. Their guiding metaphor is dance. Is one view more right than another? Are we asking the right questions about emergence? What answers are available? What questions should be asked in further research? These are some of the questions that will be explored at this research conference.
  • co-sponsored by the Zygon Center for Religion and Science and the University of California Santa Barbara, where a major research project entitled "New Visions of Nature, Science and Religion" is moving toward completion
  • to register or for more information, contact the Zygon Center at 773-256-0670, e-mail zcrs@lstc.edu, or visit http://zygoncenter.org/emergence_conference.html

Sunday, October 1, 5:00 p.m.
Screening of "The Great Story" presentation by Michael Dowd

First Unitarian Church, 5650 S. Woodlawn Ave.

  • "The Great Story" (also known as the Universe Story, Epic of Evolution, or Evolutionary Epic) is humanity's common creation story. It is the 14 billion year science-based sacred story of cosmic genesis, from the formation of the galaxies and the origin of Earth life, to the development of self-reflective consciousness and human technology, to the emergence of comprehensive compassion and tools to assist humanity in being a blessing the larger body of life. "The Great Story" is a way of telling the history of everyone and everything that honors and embraces all religious traditions and creation stories. It is the sacred narrative of an evolving Universe of emergent complexity and breathtaking creativity and cooperation--a story that offers each of us the opportunity to find meaning and purpose in our lives and our time in history.
  • for more information about "The Great Story" visit www.thegreatstory.org; for more information about this screening, call First Unitarian at 773-324-4100

Tuesday, October 3, 7:00 p.m.
Environmental Groups Orientation Meeting

South Lounge, Reynolds Club 2nd floor, 1135 E. 57th St.

  • if you're interested in learning about the student environmental groups, this is the place to be
  • representatives will be present from the Environmental Concerns Organization (ECO), Green Awareness in Action (GAIA), Green Campus Initiative (GCI), and the Religion and Environment Initiative (REI)
  • for more information, contact Sheena at sheenav@uchicago.edu

Friday, October 6, noon
"The Contingency of Capitalism" lecture

Pick Hall Lounge, 5828 S. University Ave.

  • William E. Connolly, Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University, will give a lecture based on his forthcoming book, Capitalism and Christianity, American Style
  • sponsored by the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory's Project on Politics, Piety, and the Futures of Faith
  • for more information, or to request a disability-related accomodation, contact Zachary Hooker at zhooker@uchicago.edu or 773-702-2243

Friday, October 6, 7:00 p.m.
Free Screening of Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth

Free B's, 1120 E. 54th Place (across from McCormick Seminary)

  • Al Gore's movie An Inconvenient Truth explains the best available information about global warming and its potential impacts on humanity and the rest of the world. At this FREE screening, we will watch the movie, then discuss the ethical and religious implications of global warming, and what each of us can do to help fight this looming global catastrophe.
  • cosponsored by LSTC's Green Zone, the Religion & Environment Initiative, the Environmental Concerns Organization, and Interfaith Power & Light
  • for more information about this event, or to request a disability-related accommodation, e-mail Heidi at heidimaria80@hotmail.com; for more information about An Inconvenient Truth, visit www.climatecrisis.net

Friday-Saturday, October 6-7
"Sacred Waters: Wisdom for a Thirsty World" conference

Rochester, MN

  • Throughout the wisdom traditions of the world, water is honored as essential for life. In nearly all the world's religions, water is imbued with vital spiritual and ceremonial meaning. Yet, today in our water-world, over 1.1 billion people do not have access to clean drinking water. From the wellsprings of our religious traditions, can we recover the deep water-wisdom that can sustain an emerging consciousness of global interdependence, environmental sustainability, and spiritual humility? This series of lectures re-imagines theological and spiritual perspectives of "sacred waters" from within the Christian tradition.
  • keynote speaker will be Rev. Nancy Victorin-Vangerud, PhD
  • to register, or for more information, call 507-288-1351, e-mail CAW4805@aol.com, or visit http://creativelearninginstitute.net

Monday, October 9, 4:30 p.m.
Religion & Environment Initiative Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan service events, talks, and other activities
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or relenvin@uchicago.edu

Wednesday, October 11, 9:00 p.m.
"Moyers on America: Is God Green?"

WTTW, Channel 11 (PBS)

  • For over a decade liberal Christians have made the environment a moral commitment. Now some conservative evangelicals as well are standing up for the earth as a Biblical imperative of stewardship. This documentary takes a look at the growing environmental movement in the evangelical Christian community, and explores how a serious split among conservative evangelicals over the environment and global warming could reshape American politics.
  • for more information on the program, visit http://www.pbs.org/moyers/moyersonamerica/green/index.html

Friday-Thursday, October 13-19
Screenings of Black Gold Fair Trade Coffee Documentary

Gene Siskel Film Center, 164 N. State St., Chicago

  • Come see the new documentary about Fair Trade, featuring Tadesse Meskela of Ethiopia's Oromia Coffee Cooperative, who visited the University of Chicago campus last spring. Black Gold will be showing from October 13-19 at the Gene Siskel Film Center.
  • for more information about the movie, visit www.blackgoldmovie.com; for more information about screenings, visit www.siskelfilmcenter.org

Wednesday, October 18, noon-1:30 p.m.
"Science and Ethics of Global Warming" Wednesday Lunch talk

Swift Common Room, 1025 E. 58th St.

  • Raymond T. Pierrehumbert, Louis Block Professor in Geophysical Sciences, will speak on the intersection of physical and ethical perspectives on global warming.
  • admission is $4 at the door and includes a vegetarian meal (vegan available upon request); reserve a place before Tuesday at noon by e-mailing divinitylunch@gmail.com
  • for more information, see http://divinity.uchicago.edu/news/wednesdays.shtml

Monday, October 23, 4:30 p.m.
Religion & Environment Initiative Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan service events, talks, and other activities
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or relenvin@uchicago.edu

Thursday-Saturday, October 26-28
"Without Nature? A New Condition for Theology" conference

Swift Hall, 1025 E. 58th St.

  • Acknowledging insufficiency of traditional notions of "nature," as well as the multiple ambiguities of the term's reference, this conference considers how one might constructively understand its contemporary import both in fidelity to the Christian gospel and with serious attention to pressing ethical concerns. The aim is theological, but the method interdisciplinary.
  • presenters will include Lorraine Daston, William French, Sallie McFague, Peter Raven, Edward Soja, and Kathryn Tanner
  • for details, visit http://marty-center.uchicago.edu/conferences/nature/index.shtml

Wednesday, November 1, 4:00pm
"God and the Welfare State: The Political Theology of President Bush's Faith-Based Initiative" lecture

Swift Hall, Room 106, 1025 E. 58th St.

  • lecture will be given by Lew Daly, an independent scholar and research consultant at the Schumann Center for Media & Democracy and other public policy organizations
  • This lecture is based on Daly's new book God and the Welfare State (MIT Press, 2006), which is the first detailed study of the theological roots of faith-based social policy in the U.S. Daly will discuss how century-old confessional ideas about the state were transformed into public policy by a small group of scholars, lawyers, and policymakers who worked closely with George W. Bush from his earliest days at governor of Texas. Neglected aspects of this lineage, he argues, lead to an anti-poverty debate that neither opponents nor proponents of Bush's efforts are prepared to have.
  • for more info, contact Terren Ilana Wein at 773-702-8230 or terren@uchicago.edu

Monday, November 6, 4:30 p.m.
Religion & Environment Initiative Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan service events, talks, and other activities
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or relenvin@uchicago.edu

Wednesday, November 8, 7:30-9:00pm
"The Challenges of Islam and Democracy" talk

Bond Chapel, 1050 E. 59th St.

  • In recent years many policymakers and critics have questioned whether Islam and democracy can be compatible in light of the increasing global influence of radical Islam. In this talk, Dr. Anwar Ibrahim, former Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia, will address the relationship between Islam and democracy, particularly as they relate to U.S. foreign policy objectives. The event will be followed by audience Q&A and a free reception.
  • co-sponsored by the Chicago Society and the Norman Wait Harris Fund of the Center for International Studies
  • for more information, visit http://chicagosociety.uchicago.edu or e-mail sfadil@uchicago.edu

Saturday, November 11, 10:00am-12:30pm
Work Day in Jackson Park

Meet at Darrow Bridge just behind (south of) the Museum of Science & Industry along Cornell Ave.

  • come help clear out invasive shrubs from Wooded Isle in Jackson Park
  • dress for the weather, bring something to drink, and bring work gloves if you have them
  • cosponsored by the Religion and Environment Initiative and the Environmental Concerns Organization (ECO)
  • for more information contact Megan at meganw@uchicago.edu

Thursday, November 16, 4:30pm
"The Political Sociology of World Income Inequality" lecture

Social Science Bldg., Room 122, 1126 E. 59th St.

  • speaker will be Prof. Giovanni Arrighi, Johns Hopkins University
  • sponsored by the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory as part of its "Theorizing the Present" lecture series
  • for more information contact Evalyn Tennant at 773-702-0230 or etennant@uchicago.edu

Sunday, November 19, 2:00pm
Screening of An Inconvenient Truth with Q&A following

Doc Films, Ida Noyes Hall, first floor, 1212 E. 59th St.

  • "Inconvenient" is the mildest way to describe the truth revealed by former Vice President Al Gore in this new global warming expose. Simultaneously rousing and depressing, An Inconvenient Truth mixes Gore's candid reminiscences with an elaborate cinematic lecture on the consequences of global warming adapted from the Powerpoint warhorse that Gore has delivered to stunned politicos and regular folks. If a 94-minute slide show sounds boring, think again, then come see the film.
  • Following the Sunday matinee screening, there will be a discussion led by climate scientist Ray Pierrehumbert of the U of C's Dept. of Geophysical Sciences

Monday, November 20, 4:30 p.m.
Religion & Environment Initiative Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan service events, talks, and other activities
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or relenvin@uchicago.edu

Monday, December 4, 4:30 p.m.
Religion & Environment Initiative Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan service events, talks, and other activities
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or relenvin@uchicago.edu

Thursday, December 7, 5:00-9:00pm
Holiday Party and Social Enterprise Gift Market

The Living Room Cafe, 64th and Cottage Grove, Chicago

  • Inspiration Corporation will host its first-ever Holiday Party and Social Enterprise Gift Market at The Living Room Cafe. This will be a super-fun party, where you can also shop for gifts from our programs as well as some of Chicago's other social enterprises, including the CSA Learning Center, Deborah's Place, The Enterprising Kitchen, Lamb's Farm, Little Black Pearl, and the North Lawndale Employment Project. There will also be fair-trade jewelry and accessories and custom gift baskets, along with gift-wrapping and shipping.
  • for more info, contact Jeff Adams at 773-643-6018, ext. 204 or jadams@inspirationcorp.org or visit www.inspirationcorp.org/events/events.html

Wednesday, December 13, 6:30pm
Hyde Park/Kenwood Interfaith Council Quarterly Meeting

United Church of Hyde Park, 1448 E. 53rd St.

  • This will be an important meeting at which we will discuss the Hunger Programs and the visioning process for the Interfaith Coucil. Please try to attend.
  • for more information, contact Swami Varadananda at varadananda@sbcglobal.net

Friday, January 12, 12:30pm
Planning Meeting for National Campus Day of Prayer and Reflection on Global Warming

Interfaith Center, Rockefeller Chapel basement, 5850 S. Woodlawn Ave.

  • Help plan events and an interfaith worship service for the University of Chicago's celebration of the National Campus Day of Prayer and Reflection on Global Warming in April. Our hope is to include as many religious traditions as possible in the planning process and to gather inspirational readings and other prayer materials from a wide range of faiths.
  • For more information, please contact Rev. Laura Hollinger at marie1@uchicago.edu.

Tuesday, January 16, 7:00pm
Al Gore's Powerpoint Presentation on Global Warming

Curtis Room, Meadville Lombard Theological School, 5701 S. Woodlawn Ave.

  • This presentation will be given by Sally Beth Shore, Student Minister, Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, NC.
  • For more information, contact Sally Beth at sshore@meadville.edu.

Thursday, January 18, noon-1:00pm
Environmental Justice Reading Group first meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • Anyone who is interested in learning more about environmental justice is welcome!
  • In this first session, we will be discussing Ch. 4: "The Movement for Environmental Justice in Chicago and the United States" from David Pellow's book Garbage Wars (MIT Press, 2002). Optional second reading: Ch.1: "Environmental Justice in the Twenty-first Century" by Robert D. Bullard from The Quest for Environmental Justice (Sierra Club Books, 2005).
  • Both readings may be downloaded in PDF format from our home page at rei.uchicago.edu.
  • for more information, contact Dave at envstd@uchicago.edu

Wednesday, January 24, 7:00 pm
"Climate Change: A Challenge to Scientists and Christians" lecture by Sir John Houghton

Wheaton College, Edman Chapel

  • Sir John Houghton served as Director General (later Chief Executive) of the Meteorological Office of the U.K. There he took a particular interest in research into human induced climate change and in 1988, on the formation of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, was appointed chairman of its Scientific Assessment--a position he held until 2002. After retiring from the Meteorogological Office in 1991, he became chairman of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution (1992-8) and in 1997 the Chairman of the John Ray Initiative, a charity formed to connect science, environment and Christianity in the promotion of environmental sustainability.
  • Houghton's books include The Physics of Atmospheres, Global Warming: The Complete Briefing, Does God Play Dice? and The Search for God: Can Science Help?.
  • free and open to the public
  • sponsored by the Center for Applied Christian Ethics at Wheaton College
  • for more information call 630-752-5886, e-mail cace@wheaton.edu, or visit www.christianethics.org

Thursday, January 25, noon
REI Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan events for the quarter
  • for more information, contact Dave at envstd@uchicago.edu

Thursday, January 25, 5:30-8:00pm
"Climate of Concern: Ethical and Religious Responses to Global Warming" panel discussion

Gleacher Center, 450 N. Cityfront Plaza Dr., downtown Chicago

  • As the scientific evidence for human-caused climate change becomes ever more conclusive, the focus of concern for many has been shifting from debate over scientific uncertainty to consideration of the potential global consequences of climate change, and of appropriate responses. However, despite much impassioned discussion of potential consequences, relatively little attention has been given in the public arena to the ethical and religious implications of global climate change. As individuals and societies, what are our moral and ethical responsibilities in terms of climate change? How ought we to respond to the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change? Should global warming be an issue of religious concern for people of faith? If so, how should people of faith bring their religious convictions to bear on the dangers of climate change? Should they become involved in public policy? The speakers in this panel discussion will consider questions such as these from a variety of ethical and religious standpoints.
  • panelists will be Prof. Raymond Pierrehumbert, Dept. of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, and Prof. Michael Hogue, Assistant Professor of Theology, Meadville Lombard Theological School, Chicago
  • part of the Graham School of General Studies's continuing series "Great Conversations: Religion, Science, and Culture"
  • this lecture/course costs $25; a limited number of student scholarships are available through the Religion and Environment Initiative
  • co-sponsored by the University of Chicago Religion and Environment Initiative (rei.uchicago.edu) and the Graham School of General Studies (grahamschool.uchicago.edu)
  • for more information, to register, or to request a disability-related accommodation, please call 773-702-8821 or e-mail Bart Schultz at rschultz@uchicago.edu; to inquire about student scholarships, please e-mail Dave at envstd@uchicago.edu

Sunday, January 28, 12:15pm
Community Lunch Forum on Fair Trade

Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, basement Fellowship Room, 5850 S. Woodlawn Ave.

  • Nancy Jones, director of Chicago Fair Trade, will discuss the basics of Fair Trade, what's going on with the Fair Trade movement in Chicago, and how faith communities are getting involved
  • free vegetarian lunch will be provided
  • for more information, contact Laura at marie1@uchicago.edu

Thursday, February 1, noon-1:00pm
Environmental Justice Reading Group meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • in this week's meeting, we'll be discussing farming, the food service industry, and Mexican/Mexican American workers
  • readings may be downloaded from http://rei.uchicago.edu
  • for more information, contact Dave at envstd@uchicago.edu

Thursday, February 1, 7:00pm
Third Annual Interfaith Eco-Vegan Tu B'Shvat Seder for the Trees

Bartlett Lounge (Trophy Room), first floor, 5640 S. University Ave.

  • Come help us celebrate the New Year of the Trees with a fun interfaith service, including a reading of The Lorax! (see http://www.coejl.org/tubshvat/index.php for more info about Tu B'Shvat)
  • free vegan, kosher food will be served (including nuts)
  • funded in part by SGFC
  • organized by Jewish Action and the Religion and Environment Initiative; cosponsored by Chicago Friends of Israel, Environmental Concerns Organization, Green Campus Initiative, Newberger Hillel Center, and Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
  • for more information, or to request a disability related accommodation, contact Emily at carrolle@uchicago.edu

Saturday, February 10, 10:00am-noon
Green Tech U: "Introduction to the Ethics of Sustainability"

Chicago Center for Green Technology, 445 N. Sacramento Blvd., Chicago

  • at this seminar, Rev. Clare Butterfield, Director of Faith in Place, will discuss an ethical and religious framework for environmental activity and offer some of the "best practice" stories from Chicago area congregations
  • for more information visit www.cityofchicago.org/Environment/GreenTech

Thursday, Feb. 15, noon-1:00pm
"Interfaith Organizing: What Works, What Doesn't" brown bag discussion

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • Rev. Clare Butterfield, Director of the Chicago-based nonprofit organization Faith in Place, will talk about her personal experiences with years of interfaith organizing. She will engage participants in discussion about interfaith programs, sharing approaches that she has found work particularly well in the interfaith context, as well as some others that have not turned out as well. Bring your lunch and lots of questions!
  • free light snacks and drinks will be served
  • co-sponsored by the Religion and Environment Initiative and Interfaith Dialogue
  • for more information, or to request a disability-related accommodation, please contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or daftandi@bsd.uchicago.edu

Tuesday-Thursday, February 20-22
"Environment, Economics, Equity" conference

Wheaton College, 501 College Ave., Wheaton, IL

  • topics will include "Animal Rights and Christian Responsibility," "The Care of Creation and Sustainable Development," and "Nature in the New Creation: New Testament Eschatology and the Environment"
  • sponsored by Wheaton's Center for Applied Christian Ethics
  • for more information, including a complete list of speakers and topics, call 630-752-5886, e-mail cace@wheaton.edu, or visit www.wheaton.edu/CACE/events/Conferencespringevents.htm

Thursday, February 22, noon
REI Bimonthly Planning Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help REI plan events for the quarter
  • for more information, contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or daftandi@bsd.uchicago.edu

Thursday, March 1, noon-1:00pm
Environmental Justice Reading Group meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • reading(s) may be downloaded from http://rei.uchicago.edu the Friday before the meeting
  • for more information, contact Dave at daftandi@bsd.uchicago.edu

Saturday, March 3, 10:00am-3:00pm
"Partners in Faith: Working for Human Rights and Fair Food" symposium

Euclid United Methodist Church, Oak Park, Illinois

  • You're invited to a faith-based symposium to learn how people of faith and farm workers compelled Taco Bell to end sub-poverty wages and human rights abuses in its tomato supply chain and reflect on how we can bring McDonald's and the rest of the fast-food industry to do the same
  • please contact Brigitte Gynther of Interfaith Action at Brigitte@interfaithact.org or by calling (239) 986-0688 for more information, worship and educational materials, or to arrange a farm worker speaker

Saturday, March 3, 5:30pm
"U2charist in Hyde Park: Worship Service and Holy Communion with the Music of U2"

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, Augustana Chapel, 1100 E. 55th St., Chicago

  • Tied to the deep biblical spirituality found in the music of U2, the U2charist seeks to praise God while teaching participants about the Millennium Development Goals to eradicate extreme poverty and global AIDS. The scripture readings, multimedia content, and sermons will highlight the needs of the world and our faith traditions' mandate to respond. The collected offering will be given to Episcopal Relief and Development and Lutheran World Service.
  • After the service, a free supper will be served, during which participants will be able to learn about opportunities for education, activism, and direct service in support of the Millennium Development Goals from a wide variety of local and campus organizations.
  • co-sponsored by Brent House (the Episcopal Center at the University of Chicago), Lutheran Campus Ministry at the University of Chicago, and the parish of St. Paul and the Redeemer
  • for more information about the March 3 event, please contact Rev. Stacy Alan at 773-947-8744 or stacyalan@brenthouse.org; for more information about the U2charists, visit www.e4gr.org (web site of Episcopalians for Global Responsibility) and click on the "U2charist" link

Monday, March 5, 7:00pm
"Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and Other 'Natural' Evils: The Human Element" lecture

Lutheran School of Theology, Common Room 350, 1100 E. 55th St.

  • speaker will be Dr. Paul Heltne, ecologist, Center for Humans and Nature, Chicago
  • Dr. Heltne's talk is part of an advanced seminar in religion and science entitled "Evil: Perspectives from Theology and Science"
  • free and open to the public
  • sponsored by the Zygon Center for Religion and Science
  • for more information, contact the Zygon Center at 773-256-0670, zcrs@lstc.edu, or www.zygoncenter.org

Tuesday-Thursday, March 20-22
"Peacemaking in an Age of Terror" conference

Loyola University Chicago, Lake Shore Campus

  • "Peacemaking in an Age of Terror" will focus primarily on the distinctive new challenges of international terrorism and extremist politics. We wish also to spotlight the ongoing significance of peacemaking challenges that lie far apart from responses to terrorist threats. These spheres of conflict, sufferings, and violence--at the societal and local level, though perhaps less dramatic and certainly less attended to by the dominant media--remain critically important venues of peace and justice work. Accordingly, our conference will highlight how peacemaking remains a broad commitment of efforts devoted to international, societal, and local problems of conflict, overt violence, structural violence, and inequality.
  • The general public is welcome!
  • sponsored by Loyola's Center for Ethics and Social Justice
  • for more information, including a list of major speakers, visit www.luc.edu/ethics/04103peace07.shtml

Tuesday, March 27, 6:30pm
"Black Gold" Screening and Panel Discussion

Harold Washington Public Library, 400 S. State St., Chicago

  • Multinational coffee companies now rule our shopping malls and supermarkets and dominate the industry worth over $80 billion, making coffee the most valuable trading commodity in the world after oil. But while we continue to pay for our lattes and cappuccinos, the price paid to coffee farmers remains so low that many have been forced to abandon their coffee fields.
  • Nowhere is this paradox more evident than in Ethiopia, the birthplace of coffee. Tadesse Meskela is one man on a mission to save his 74,000 struggling coffee farmers from bankruptcy. As his farmers strive to harvest some of the highest quality coffee beans on the international market, Tadesse travels the world in an attempt to find buyers willing to pay a fair price. Against the backdrop of Tadesse's journey to London and Seattle, the enormous power of the multinational players that dominate the world's coffee trade becomes apparent. New York commodity traders, the international coffee exchanges, and the double dealings of trade ministers at the World Trade Organization reveal the many challenges Tadesse faces in his quest for a long term solution for his farmers.
  • for more information about "Black Gold," visit www.blackgoldmovie.com

Thursday, March 29, 4:00-6:00pm
Chicago Interfaith Training

McCormick Theological Seminary, Common Room 105, 5460 S. University Ave.

  • The Challenge: America is the most religiously diverse country in the world and the most religiously diverse country in the West. How can seminary (and other) students be prepared to work in this world?
  • The Event: Join Dr. Eboo Patel and Cassie Meyer from the Interfaith Youth Core and seminary (and other) students from around Chicago for a training on interfaith work.
  • for more information, contact Adam Dichsen at adamdichsen@yahoo.com or Cassie Meyer at cassie@ifyc.org

Thursday, March 29, 7:00-8:30pm
"Global Climate Change: What Is Happening and What We Can Do About It?" lecture

Lutheran School of Theology, Common Room 350, 1100 E. 55th St.

  • lecturer will be Raymond Pierrehumbert, Louis Block Professor in the Dept. of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago
  • free and open to the public
  • sponsored by the Lutheran School of Theology; cosponsored by McCormick Theological Seminary, the Religion and Environment Initiative, and the Zygon Center for Religion and Science
  • for more information, contact Prof. David Rhoads at drhoads@lstc.edu or 773-256-0774

Saturday, March 31, 10:00am-4:00pm
Illinois Student Environmental Coalition inaugural conference

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

  • come help create a statewide student environmental agenda and share your vision for this new coalition of Illinois student environmental groups
  • Lt. Governor Pat Quinn will speak about campus sustainable energy programs
  • workshops will provide tips on campus renewable energy and recycling and recruiting and retaining members
  • low student registration fee of $10 includes refreshments and lunch
  • to register online visit https://www.123signup.com/register?id=qkrnt
  • for more information call 312-795-3733 or e-mail Brian Korpics at BKorpics@elpc.org or Elizabeth Thompson at EThompson@elpc.org

Thursday, April 5, 4:30pm
REI Bimonthly Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help plan REI events
  • for more info contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or envstd@uchicago.edu

Thursday, April 5, 6:00pm
"Islam and Social Activism" lecture

Harper 140, 1116 E. 59th St.

  • speaker will be Mahdi Bray, longtime civil and human rights activist, who is currently Executive Director of the Muslim American Society Freedom Foundation and President of the Coordinating Council of Muslim Organizations
  • sponsored by MSA
  • for more information, contact Afshan1@uchicago.edu

Sunday, April 8, 7:00pm
4th Annual Interfaith Social Justice Seder

Ida Noyes Library, 1st floor, 1212 E. 59th St.

  • Join us for this unique Passover seder, in which we explore modern slavery, oppression, and how we can work together to overcome them.
  • free vegetarian, kosher for Passover food, with vegan options
  • optional donations to Partners in Health (www.pih.org) encouraged
  • sponsored by Newberger Hillel Center, Jewish Action, Religion and Environment Initiative, Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, National Organization for Women (NOW) at the U of C, STAND, and SGFC
  • for more information, or to request a disability-related accommodation, contact dpheller@uchicago.edu

Wednesday, April 11, noon-1:30 p.m.
"Making the Earth Covenant" Wednesday Lunch talk for Earth Month

Swift Hall Common Room, 1st floor, 1025 E. 58th St.

  • J. Ronald Engel, Senior Research Fellow at the Martin Marty Center, and Professor Emeritus at Meadville Lombard Theological Seminary, will speak about his current research on the meaning of contemporary calls for a "New Earth Covenant." A pioneer in the fields of environmental ethics, history, and theology/philosophy, Prof. Engel has made major contributions to the movement for eco-justice within the ecumenical religious community.
  • this lunch is co-sponsored by the Divinity School and the Religion and Environment Initiative as part of Earth Month
  • admission is $5 at the door ($4 students) and includes a vegetarian meal (vegan available upon request); reserve a place before Tuesday at noon by e-mailing divinitylunch@gmail.com
  • for more information, see http://divinity.uchicago.edu/news/wednesdays.shtml

Thursday, April 19, 4:30pm
REI Bimonthly Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help plan REI events
  • for more info contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or envstd@uchicago.edu

Friday, April 20, 11:30am
Interfaith Service for National Day of Prayer and Reflection on Global Warming

Common Room, first floor, Swift Hall, 1025 E. 58th St.

  • Join us for an interfaith service of readings, music, and reflection on global warming, followed by a procession and reception with free vegan, kosher food.
  • for more information, contact Rev. Laura Hollinger at marie1@uchicago.edu

Sunday, April 22, 12:30-5:30 p.m.
Interfaith Day of Service for Earth Day

Meet at Interreligious Center, Rockefeller Memorial Chapel basement, 5850 S. Woodlawn Ave.

  • this event will begin with a talk on Baha'i perspectives on service and interfaith discussion
  • then, we will walk to Jackson Park for an afternoon of gardening and restoration work
  • finally, a free vegetarian Indian meal will be offered afterward at the Chapel
  • sponsored by the Interfaith Dialogue
  • space is limited; RSVP required
  • to RSVP, or for more information, contact Zoe at zmhruban@uchicago.edu

Wednesday, April 25, 7:00-8:30pm
"Ecological Justice and Environmental Racism" lecture

Lutheran School of Theology, Common Room 350, 1100 E. 55th St.

  • lecturer will be Dwight Hopkins, Professor of Theology at the University of Chicago Divinity School, and author of, among other books, Being Human: Race, Culture, and Religion; Shoes That Fit Our Feet: Sources for a Constructive Black Theology; and Introducing Black Theology of Liberation
  • free and open to the public
  • sponsored by the Lutheran School of Theology; cosponsored by McCormick Theological Seminary, the Religion and Environment Initiative, and the Zygon Center for Religion and Science
  • for more information, contact Prof. David Rhoads at drhoads@lstc.edu or 773-256-0774

Thursday, May 3, 4:30pm
REI Bimonthly Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help plan REI events
  • for more info contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or envstd@uchicago.edu

Saturday, May 5, 1:00pm
Community Garden Work Day

65th & Woodlawn

  • UGROW (Urban Gardeners Reclaiming Our Woodlawn), an Urban Gardening Project of STOP, is looking for volunteers to help clear our garden site on 65th and Woodlawn to make way for spring plantings.
  • Refreshments will be provided!
  • for more information, please contact Ebonee Stevenson at 773-753-9674 or email her at ebonee.stevenson@gmail.com

Sunday, May 6, 1:00-5:00pm
"What Would It Take To Help Your Congregation Adopt Better Environmental Practices?" workshop

Chicago Center for Green Technology; 445 N. Sacramento Blvd., Chicago

  • Faith In Place's "What Would It Take?" workshop is back and keeps getting better--all new topics for your congregation to keep growing in its concern and care for the Earth. Join us if you're curious about geothermal heating, supporting local agriculture, conservation easements, water conservation, the deal with biofuels, best congregational practices, and more!
  • $15 registration fee is requested, payable at the door; congregations may send three people for a $30 contribution (this is a suggested amount; no one will be turned away)
  • to register or for more information, visit http://www.faithinplace.org/events.php?ID=35

Saturday, May 12, 8:00am-2:30pm
University Community Service Center's Spring Day of Service

meet at Reynolds Club, 1135 E. 57th St.

  • Participants will meet at the Reynolds Club at 8:00am. From here, groups will travel to Blue Island to work with the Friends of the Chicago River for their annual "Chicago River Day," during which they will be cleaning up a section of the river. After the clean up, groups will travel to the closing festival for lunch and other activities. We should be back in Hyde Park by 2:30pm.
  • If you wish to participate in the service but not attend the festival, we will have transportation provided back to Hyde Park around noon. Please note that lunch will be served at the festival; participants choosing to return directly to campus from the service activity will not be able to join us for lunch.
  • To participate in the Day of Service, please contact Andrew Flowers *as soon as possible* (mailto: ucsc@uchicago.edu with Attn: Andrew in the subject line).
  • Students, both groups and individuals, staff, and faculty are encouraged to participate. However, please note that space is limited and spots will be reserved on a first come, first served basis. Groups who wish to participate need to send an e-mail with the /names and emails /of all the people from the group who are participating.
  • If you have any questions, send a message to ucsc@uchicago.edu (again, with Attn: Andrew in the subject line). You can also call UCSC at 773-753-4483 and ask for Andrew Flowers or David Hays.

Tuesday, May 15, 4:30pm
"Is It Meaningful to Speak of an 'Earth Covenant'?" workshop with Ron Engel

Pick Hall, Room 105, 5828 S. University Ave.

  • presenter will be J. Ronald Engel, Professor Emeritus of Social and Environmental Ethics at Meadville Lombard Theological School
  • co-sponsored by the Workshop on the Global Environment and the U of C Religion and Environment Initiative
  • for more information, or to request a disability-related accommodation, please contact Andrew at bauer@uchicago.edu

Thursday, May 17, 4:30pm
REI Bimonthly Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help plan REI events
  • for more info contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or envstd@uchicago.edu

Saturday, May 19, 9:00am-1:00pm
"Creation Celebration!" restoration work-day

Theodore Stone Prairie, 67th St. east of LaGrange Rd.

  • Celebrate spring amid the beauty of creation by helping restore natural habitat for all of God's creatures. Join people of many faiths honoring the beauty of creation, removing invasive weeds and shrubs, and touring raree natural habitat.
  • Easy and fun; no experience required. Bring the kids! Snacks and drinks will be provided for everyone.
  • Dress for the weather and wear garden or work gloves.
  • For more information, contact Dave Lloyd at 708-485-2296 or davelloyd@mindspring.com

Saturday, May 19, 9:20am-12:30pm
Environmental Justice Tour of Little Village

Meet at Reynolds Club, 5706 S. University Ave., Chicago

  • Green Awareness in Action (GAIA) is teaming up with the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO) and Kenwood Academy to take a walking tour highlighting the environmental concerns of the Little Village area and Chicago at large. This is a great opportunity to learn more about each organization as well as environmental issues affecting Chicago today and the entire trip is completely free!
  • to learn more about LVEJO check out their website at www.lvejo.org
  • to RSVP or for more information, contact Laura Fuchs at laura07@uchicago.edu

Sunday, May 20, 1:00-4:00 pm
"Sowing Seeds of Care: Hands-on Habitat Restoration with the Evanston Interreligious Sustainability Circle"

Harms Woods Forest Preserve, on Harms Rd. just south of Glenview Rd., Glenview, IL

  • This habitat restoration afternoon will offer three alternative activities: cutting down buckthorn bushes, pulling up garlic mustard plants, or sowing seeds of native species that were collected last fall.
  • Meet at the Forest Preserve parking lot on the west side of Harms Road, just south of Glenview Road. Come dressed for the woods.
  • Opening religious ceremony starts at 1:15 p.m.
  • for more information or to RSVP, call Steve Perkins at 773-269-4055 or email steve@cnt.org

Tuesday, May 29, 4:30-6:00pm
"To Subdue and Dominate: A Re-reading of the Imago Dei in Light of Our Ecological Crisis" workshop

Pick Hall 105, 5828 S. University Ave.

  • presenter will be Kristel Clayville, PhD student, University of Chicago Divinity School
  • sponsored by the Workshop on the Global Environment and the Religion and Environment Initiative
  • for more information, or to request a disability-related accommodation, please contact Andrew Bauer at bauer@uchicago.edu

Thursday, May 31, 4:30pm
REI Bimonthly Meeting

Cummings Life Science Center, Room 157B, 920 E. 58th St.

  • come help plan REI events
  • for more info contact Dave at 773-834-0621 or envstd@uchicago.edu

Thursday-Saturday, June 7-9
Environmental Justice Research Symposium

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  • This conference will focus on diversity in academia as well as domestic and international environmental justice research. The conference will bring together researchers who are academics, postdoctoral fellows, students, policymakers, environmental justice practitioners, activists, and grantmakers to participate in plenaries, panels, and poster sessions.
  • abstracts are due February 15, and final papers (for those wanting to submit articles for a book) are due on May 30
  • sponsored by the School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • for more information, visit http://sitemaker.umich.edu/diversityejresearchsymposium/conference_announcement or contact Latonia Payne at 734-615-2602 or paynel@umich.edu

Tuesday, June 19, 6:00pm
"Imagine Chicago as a Fair Trade City!" meeting

Chicago Fair Trade, 637 S. Dearborn, Chicago

  • Conversations are happening in cities around the country about developing a U.S. model for fair trade towns/cities based on the European model. Help create this model! Join Chicago Fair Trade at this meeting to explore the possibilities for Chicago. Decide what role you want to play in moving forward the agenda for trade justice and sustainable communities.
  • Special guests will be Sadhu Johnston, Commissioner, City of Chicago Department of Environment, and Shayna Harris of Oxfam America.
  • refreshments will be served
  • sponsored by Chicago Fair Trade
  • for more info or to RSVP, please email njones@chicagofairtrade.org or call 312-212-1760

Friday, June 29, 9:00-10:00am
Interfaith Celebration of Lake Michigan

12th Street Beach, Northerly Island, downtown Chicago

  • Faith in Place staff will be among the celebrants at this grassroots, interfaith celebration giving thanks for the gifts of the lake and water.
  • Offering a blessing in the Buddhist tradition will be the Kamba Lama of Mongolia, whose vision that it was an auspicious time to bless the lake inspired this gathering.
  • for more information, contact Faith in Place at 312-733-4640 or clare@faithinplace.org

Past REI Events, 2005-2006

Past REI Events, 2004-2005

 
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rei: religion and environment initiative
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